6. Meta-blogging: Self-helped therapy

I was pushed out on a wheelchair; the walk from the ward to the car was just a bit too far. As the doors to the hospital swung open and I was gladly ejected, the fresh Spring air breezed over me refreshingly, as if blowing away all the dust that had settled on me during that previous week. I left that hospital behind me like I used to leave the final exam halls as a teenager: pleased it’s over and glad to get the hell out.

James drove the car very slowly and carefully, negotiating speed-bumps ever so gently so that I was as comfortable as possible. Still, every movement took my breath away. Quite frankly, I felt like I had been hit by a freight train. Getting home after a week like that is always going to be strange, if not a little overwhelming. I remember sitting there on the sofa and just ‘being’. It’s quite strange, in my recoveries from numerous foot operations, I have always reached straight for the DVD box-sets once I get home, but this time I had absolutely no inclination of that kind. In the midst of my screaming painful body, I was contented to be just in the solace of my own company….be it writing school reports, doing some school planning, reading a book or a magazine. After the chaos of the previous week I just wanted to be still and quiet. I didn’t feel the need to just pass time mindlessly watching TV, in fact I found it mildly irritating. It’s like my mind could not rest in the passive abandon of external entertainment. Something inside me wanted out.

So I started writing this blog.

Meta-blog

I remember my surgeon telling me the evening he delivered the pathology results that I may wish to seek counselling. He suggested the Cancer Society. He told me that I would be signed off for work for at least 6-12 weeks (WHAT??? Not likely!!) mainly due to the possible psychological effects of what I have been through. He told me that the physical side of things would take 4-6 weeks to settle down (and he was bang-on the money with that estimate) but it may take me a lot longer to deal with things mentally.

It’s not until you get home that everything begins to sink in. You guiltily pick up Google and test a few searches: “psychological effects of tumours….”, “recovery after primary cancer surgery….”, “pheochromocytoma recovery….”, “recurrence of pheos…”(no, stop it!), “cancer.org.nz…”(I said stop it!!!), “counselling services Auckland…” (perhaps, not yet), “tumour surgery recovery….”, “self-help primary cancer…”. I find myself in a whirlwind of information, various possible routes to take, not sure what applies to me and not sure whether to give it time and just see how I go. After all, perhaps I wouldn’t be so afraid of my thoughts if my surgeon hadn’t said it was probably going to be an emotional roller-coaster ahead?

Without a doubt, it was when I started searching along the path of fellow pheo patients that I realised how little there was out there for advice – “patient stories of pheo recovery/pheo patient experiences…” and similar searches would only bring up as few unhelpful wittering patient forums, sharing symptoms pre-surgery rather than anything related to the recovery process. Perhaps I should have been looking for liver transplant surgery recovery, since that was ultimately the kind of surgery I had just had. But a big part of me knew that it wasn’t just the surgery as such that was clouding my mind, it was the nature of the beast the surgery was fixing.

Nobody, it seems, feels willing to share their experience in any detail. The few blogs I did find for pheos were largely bible-thumping Americans who wanted nothing other than thank the Lord for their spared life after surgery. Don’t get me wrong, I can understand that, I have questioned my spirituality (or shameful lack of it!!) many times since all of this has happened. Perhaps I do need to connect with faith and just be thankful? However, something was nagging at me. The one thing I lacked prior to my surgery and still lacked moving forward was knowledge. Pheochromocytoma is a rare type of tumour so I guess the numbers of patients are limited. Go search any other type of tumour and you’ll come across plenty, too many stories, blogs and forums. But it still seemed extraordinary to me that there are so few patient stories for pheos.

So I made a decision. I would write a blog….the kind of blog I wished I had found along my journey. A bare-all blog. A chance to get out all of this heaviness I felt in my heart and get the confusion straightened out in my head. I have blogged before, whilst travelling, and I found it therapeutic and levelling during a time in my life when everything was uncertain. This time I really do need the therapy that putting pen to paper and pouring out your soul offers. And I could hold-fire on counselling and other routes towards more stable mental health if I managed a self-help option of my own.

I decided already that I wouldn’t be holding anything back, smoothing over any rough edges or exaggerating any part of it. This would be my story, my retrospective diary of by far the toughest challenge I have ever had to face. At many points during this process, my gradually healing mind has questioned whether I’m revealing too much. There are so many private things that I could (some may say should) have kept to myself. But after my fruitless search for an honest account that would help or guide me, I felt I owed my absolute honesty to that one person who may pick this up one day during their fervent desperate google searches, having just been diagnosed with pheochromocytoma…or another cancer requiring major surgery. And in doing so, I get to let go of every hidden-away feeling and anxiety that lurks in the back of my mind. In my opinion, it’s ok to be honest with the world. It’s ok to share thoughts and feelings that other people may frown upon. It’s the motivation for doing it that really counts. I’m very lucky that I was brought up in this way – being open-hearted and honest are qualities I can thank my lovely Mum for. She so desperately wanted to be with me through this time, as did my sisters. However, I made this choice to live so far from home and it certainly feels like a sacrifice at times like this. In sharing this blog, my Mum has thanked me for letting her feel like she was here, seeing it all through my eyes. So this blog has many personal benefits. It has also helped her understand it all where distance really doesn’t allow such understanding, despite the wonderful world of technology we live in.

Talking of technology, I have been overwhelmed by how kind everyone has been from the first post I made on facebook, ten days after my initial scan. Once I was sure what I was dealing with, I put a typically honest post up about my tumour and upcoming surgery. From the moment that went up, I have been inundated with messages of support, messages sharing people’s own or loved ones’ experiences…..stories of hope and encouragement that boosted me along. James even arranged for my friends all over the world to post videos wishing me luck throughout the weekend leading up to my surgery. Seeing the faces and hearing the voices of my family and friends, old and new, near and far, was so powerful. I was watching them, with a smile on my face, right up to the point I left my room for theatre….for that I am grateful to you all from the bottom of my heart. I have often wondered what it would have been like going through this type of thing so far from home 20 years ago, before the world of emails, instant messaging and Skype/FaceTime. I would have felt more isolated than I could ever imagine. I probably would have gone home. But thanks to technology of today, I have felt loved and supported from my wonderful friends and family in all corners of the globe. We are all able to live lives many miles across vast oceans from home, and at the touch of a button our loved ones back home are there smiling on a screen in front of us. However, no virtual hug can ever compare to having people right there by your side. I still felt homesick.

Then I start thinking about 100 years ago…..it doesn’t bear thinking about the suffering people must have gone through in these situations. Today’s advances in medicine and technology really should not ever be taken for granted.

There’s a saying: a problem shared is a problem halved. Not all of us find this easy, but I am certainly a heart-on-my-sleeve type…..so with every tapped out word on my iPad here on this blog, I shake away a little bit more of that dust that had settled deep within my soul during these past few months.

I didn’t think there would be many chapters to this blog as I started writing. The hard stuff was all over surely now I’m out of hospital…..not a great deal to write about? However my road to recovery was not going to be that easy. Days go by where my energy and strength would fluctuate up and down for no apparent reason. My pain levels were extreme, I just couldn’t get comfortable whichever way I sat or stood. Lying down flat was not an option, so I pile up the pillows and sit up in bed and steal some fitful hours of sleep. You reluctantly pop more morphine (choose from your 3 options of laxatives as a chaser), heat up the wheat bag for the 20th time in the day and wish you had more of them to jig-saw on various aching parts of your tummy, shoulders and back.

Drugs

James continued to encourage me to get out for walks and carry on with my breathing exercises when my body was on fire with pain. He supported me patiently through it but both of us felt confused and at a dead-end. Perhaps this is just how it is? Perhaps my pain threshold is very low? Again I consult Dr Google, punching out my symptoms angrily wondering why this nightmare won’t end.

So this isn’t my final chapter as it could have been…..and my self-help therapy continues.

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