Tag Archives: recovery

6. Meta-blogging: Self-helped therapy

I was pushed out on a wheelchair; the walk from the ward to the car was just a bit too far. As the doors to the hospital swung open and I was gladly ejected, the fresh Spring air breezed over me refreshingly, as if blowing away all the dust that had settled on me during that previous week. I left that hospital behind me like I used to leave the final exam halls as a teenager: pleased it’s over and glad to get the hell out.

James drove the car very slowly and carefully, negotiating speed-bumps ever so gently so that I was as comfortable as possible. Still, every movement took my breath away. Quite frankly, I felt like I had been hit by a freight train. Getting home after a week like that is always going to be strange, if not a little overwhelming. I remember sitting there on the sofa and just ‘being’. It’s quite strange, in my recoveries from numerous foot operations, I have always reached straight for the DVD box-sets once I get home, but this time I had absolutely no inclination of that kind. In the midst of my screaming painful body, I was contented to be just in the solace of my own company….be it writing school reports, doing some school planning, reading a book or a magazine. After the chaos of the previous week I just wanted to be still and quiet. I didn’t feel the need to just pass time mindlessly watching TV, in fact I found it mildly irritating. It’s like my mind could not rest in the passive abandon of external entertainment. Something inside me wanted out.

So I started writing this blog.

Meta-blog

I remember my surgeon telling me the evening he delivered the pathology results that I may wish to seek counselling. He suggested the Cancer Society. He told me that I would be signed off for work for at least 6-12 weeks (WHAT??? Not likely!!) mainly due to the possible psychological effects of what I have been through. He told me that the physical side of things would take 4-6 weeks to settle down (and he was bang-on the money with that estimate) but it may take me a lot longer to deal with things mentally.

It’s not until you get home that everything begins to sink in. You guiltily pick up Google and test a few searches: “psychological effects of tumours….”, “recovery after primary cancer surgery….”, “pheochromocytoma recovery….”, “recurrence of pheos…”(no, stop it!), “cancer.org.nz…”(I said stop it!!!), “counselling services Auckland…” (perhaps, not yet), “tumour surgery recovery….”, “self-help primary cancer…”. I find myself in a whirlwind of information, various possible routes to take, not sure what applies to me and not sure whether to give it time and just see how I go. After all, perhaps I wouldn’t be so afraid of my thoughts if my surgeon hadn’t said it was probably going to be an emotional roller-coaster ahead?

Without a doubt, it was when I started searching along the path of fellow pheo patients that I realised how little there was out there for advice – “patient stories of pheo recovery/pheo patient experiences…” and similar searches would only bring up as few unhelpful wittering patient forums, sharing symptoms pre-surgery rather than anything related to the recovery process. Perhaps I should have been looking for liver transplant surgery recovery, since that was ultimately the kind of surgery I had just had. But a big part of me knew that it wasn’t just the surgery as such that was clouding my mind, it was the nature of the beast the surgery was fixing.

Nobody, it seems, feels willing to share their experience in any detail. The few blogs I did find for pheos were largely bible-thumping Americans who wanted nothing other than thank the Lord for their spared life after surgery. Don’t get me wrong, I can understand that, I have questioned my spirituality (or shameful lack of it!!) many times since all of this has happened. Perhaps I do need to connect with faith and just be thankful? However, something was nagging at me. The one thing I lacked prior to my surgery and still lacked moving forward was knowledge. Pheochromocytoma is a rare type of tumour so I guess the numbers of patients are limited. Go search any other type of tumour and you’ll come across plenty, too many stories, blogs and forums. But it still seemed extraordinary to me that there are so few patient stories for pheos.

So I made a decision. I would write a blog….the kind of blog I wished I had found along my journey. A bare-all blog. A chance to get out all of this heaviness I felt in my heart and get the confusion straightened out in my head. I have blogged before, whilst travelling, and I found it therapeutic and levelling during a time in my life when everything was uncertain. This time I really do need the therapy that putting pen to paper and pouring out your soul offers. And I could hold-fire on counselling and other routes towards more stable mental health if I managed a self-help option of my own.

I decided already that I wouldn’t be holding anything back, smoothing over any rough edges or exaggerating any part of it. This would be my story, my retrospective diary of by far the toughest challenge I have ever had to face. At many points during this process, my gradually healing mind has questioned whether I’m revealing too much. There are so many private things that I could (some may say should) have kept to myself. But after my fruitless search for an honest account that would help or guide me, I felt I owed my absolute honesty to that one person who may pick this up one day during their fervent desperate google searches, having just been diagnosed with pheochromocytoma…or another cancer requiring major surgery. And in doing so, I get to let go of every hidden-away feeling and anxiety that lurks in the back of my mind. In my opinion, it’s ok to be honest with the world. It’s ok to share thoughts and feelings that other people may frown upon. It’s the motivation for doing it that really counts. I’m very lucky that I was brought up in this way – being open-hearted and honest are qualities I can thank my lovely Mum for. She so desperately wanted to be with me through this time, as did my sisters. However, I made this choice to live so far from home and it certainly feels like a sacrifice at times like this. In sharing this blog, my Mum has thanked me for letting her feel like she was here, seeing it all through my eyes. So this blog has many personal benefits. It has also helped her understand it all where distance really doesn’t allow such understanding, despite the wonderful world of technology we live in.

Talking of technology, I have been overwhelmed by how kind everyone has been from the first post I made on facebook, ten days after my initial scan. Once I was sure what I was dealing with, I put a typically honest post up about my tumour and upcoming surgery. From the moment that went up, I have been inundated with messages of support, messages sharing people’s own or loved ones’ experiences…..stories of hope and encouragement that boosted me along. James even arranged for my friends all over the world to post videos wishing me luck throughout the weekend leading up to my surgery. Seeing the faces and hearing the voices of my family and friends, old and new, near and far, was so powerful. I was watching them, with a smile on my face, right up to the point I left my room for theatre….for that I am grateful to you all from the bottom of my heart. I have often wondered what it would have been like going through this type of thing so far from home 20 years ago, before the world of emails, instant messaging and Skype/FaceTime. I would have felt more isolated than I could ever imagine. I probably would have gone home. But thanks to technology of today, I have felt loved and supported from my wonderful friends and family in all corners of the globe. We are all able to live lives many miles across vast oceans from home, and at the touch of a button our loved ones back home are there smiling on a screen in front of us. However, no virtual hug can ever compare to having people right there by your side. I still felt homesick.

Then I start thinking about 100 years ago…..it doesn’t bear thinking about the suffering people must have gone through in these situations. Today’s advances in medicine and technology really should not ever be taken for granted.

There’s a saying: a problem shared is a problem halved. Not all of us find this easy, but I am certainly a heart-on-my-sleeve type…..so with every tapped out word on my iPad here on this blog, I shake away a little bit more of that dust that had settled deep within my soul during these past few months.

I didn’t think there would be many chapters to this blog as I started writing. The hard stuff was all over surely now I’m out of hospital…..not a great deal to write about? However my road to recovery was not going to be that easy. Days go by where my energy and strength would fluctuate up and down for no apparent reason. My pain levels were extreme, I just couldn’t get comfortable whichever way I sat or stood. Lying down flat was not an option, so I pile up the pillows and sit up in bed and steal some fitful hours of sleep. You reluctantly pop more morphine (choose from your 3 options of laxatives as a chaser), heat up the wheat bag for the 20th time in the day and wish you had more of them to jig-saw on various aching parts of your tummy, shoulders and back.

Drugs

James continued to encourage me to get out for walks and carry on with my breathing exercises when my body was on fire with pain. He supported me patiently through it but both of us felt confused and at a dead-end. Perhaps this is just how it is? Perhaps my pain threshold is very low? Again I consult Dr Google, punching out my symptoms angrily wondering why this nightmare won’t end.

So this isn’t my final chapter as it could have been…..and my self-help therapy continues.

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5. Every cloud has a silver lining

I arrived down on the ward to welcome peace and solitude. I had a nurse tending to me 24-7 but on a much less hectic level. I left a few of my pipes up in ICU too so I felt a little less like a Christmas tree.

Lines

Finally, I am also allowed visitors other than Dad and James, not that they weren’t enough, but the friendly faces I would see in the following week would really help me along on my way towards positive thinking…..and give Dad a chance to duck out of the room to have his own time-out having sat tirelessly at my bedside throughout my stay in hospital.  I must say, a few weeks on now, I am blown away by the kindness of Kiwis. I have had endless visits, meals made, pick-ups for walks, flowers, coffees, sweet delights and well-wishes. I was heavily on drugs so I had to write down who had been to see me, otherwise I would surely forget….but each and every visitor was appreciated, helped pass the time, made me smile, tried not to make me laugh – the agony- thank goodness for my coughing pillow….!

Ah yes, coughing pillows…..

The nurse had given me a lecture about this the night before my surgery, which had gone completely over my head as I was far to preoccupied with my nerves to listen. After abdominal surgery, coughing pillows become your best friend. For my surgery, a giant L shape was cut down from my sternum to just above my belly-button and across to my flank. In this process, of course, huge amounts of abdominal muscles are sliced through, leaving them rather broken and painful afterwards. It’s amazing how much you discover your ‘core’ muscles are responsible for…..pretty much everything! Every movement you make involves some part of the core, therefore mobility is nigh on impossible without pain.

Breathing, lying, turning, sitting up, standing straight, walking, talking, laughing, coughing……all agony!

Seriously, no lesson is required by a nurse….you grab that pillow and clutch it tight to your tummy, like a child clutches his teddy bear, thankful for the comfort and fearful of losing him. When it drops from the bed or you lose sight of it momentarily, panic sets in. It’s just a pillow…..but sometimes the simple things are the most effective.

I remember my first shower, after 2 days in ICU where showering is not high on the list of priorities, you feel pretty grim. It’s a fine line between how grim and dirty you feel, and how much pain you can face to endure the shower. You know it’s coming….but you’re in denial. In she comes, bright and breezy “Let’s get you in that shower for a nice scrub….it will make you feel a million dollars!”. Yeah right.

Dad gets kicked out and after a quick press of my pain pump, I’m hauled up from my bed by two nurses, reluctantly and painfully. One nurse goes in with me, disconnecting lines and carrying my bag of pee as she wheels me in on a chair… can hardly keep my head up and nausea has already started to creep in. Again I start to feel resentful that my condition is so much worse than I was prepared for. Resentful to whom? I have no idea……I’m just feeling pretty damned sorry for myself by now.

Hospital gown whipped off, suddenly I’m aware I’m naked and there’s a big mirror in front of me. I slowly lift my head as the nurse splashes and soaps me gently all over my body. All I can see is this frail person, who I’m sure isn’t me. She has a very pale face with big black bags under tired puffy red eyes and she’s slumped like an old lady in the chair. She’s got lines coming out of her neck and her arms. Her belly is swollen and there’s a huge blood-stained dressing across her tummy. She looks so sad.

Suddenly I’m next door in my room again and there’s general panic around me…. a nurse is pumping my arm full of something from a syringe, my Dad is there holding my hand and I’m pushing him away. Pushing my Dad away, what has possessed me? I can’t think straight, the nausea is consuming me. I hear an Irish lady’s voice saying she knew getting me up was a bad idea. Just let me lie down, is all I can think. There’s a conversation about how they need to try to get me to sit in the chair…..I’m too sick. Just let me get into bed again! This is pretty much how it goes for my first few mornings on the ward, and I would pay for it later in my lungs. The problem is, after major abdominal surgery, your lung often collapses and the only way to re-inflate it is to move and breathe deeper! I was given a little breathing gadget too to inflate my lungs, 3 balls that you would have to try to pull up with your breath and hold for 3 seconds, sounds easy….no. Physios came and went, tried to get me on my feet for a walk and soon enough my head would spin, blood pressure plummet and nausea would creep in.  I would only manage any sort of mobility in the afternoon, usually with the help of my Dad or James doing his evening Breathing Boot Camp sessions – he would walk backwards ahead of me as I shuffle with my zimmerframe and later without, telling me to breathe in, breathe out, chest up, look at me! I’ll tell you something, that is one good man I found there….I didn’t think it was possible to be loved so unconditionally. All he cared about was me getting better……. during my dark insecure moments in the last few weeks where I would worry he must be fed up with me by now, he would reassure me: ‘nothing matters to me apart from you and you getting better….everything else is just noise!’. It takes a very special kind of person to support someone so selflessly through chronic illness. I’m so lucky I have someone that special.

James

Someone that special, can also be that naughty! James would arrive early in the morning, chat up the young trainee nurses to go get him toast, even eggs! He would then arrive on the evening, take over from my weary Dad after a day ‘on watch’ and he would chat up the nurses again to get him wine! He even managed to get a red wine delivered to him whilst I was in ICU….then the charge nurse arrived the next morning and saw the empty glass next to my bed, well you can imagine the reaction!! In my drugged state, I couldn’t even think of a good story as to why it was there, shame really!

James misbehaving

James also developed a ‘special’ relationship with my lovely Irish nurse, who’s jolly nature kept me going for the week. The first morning she met him, half way through munching on toast he shouldn’t even have, he introduces himself as Horrace. Poor woman, believed him when he refused to back down. I’m lying there cringing and clutching my pillow as the giggles escape and my tummy muscles burn with pain. He knows exactlly how to make me laugh, and never tried to avoid it. Despite it being a very rough week, I remember so many funny times with James. They do say laughter is the best form of medicine! You go through a roller coaster of emotions, and sometimes you don’t know whether to laugh or cry…..James and I certainly went through both of these emotions together. Squeezing onto the bed beside me to cuddle me before he left in the evening, it shocked me to see the tears well up in his eyes and roll down onto the pillow. It was as tough for him as it was for me. It certainly was a week that inevitably brought us infinitely closer……but a week I hope we never have to repeat.

Every day my surgeon and my anaesthetist would visit me morning and evening without fail. They would check how I’m feeling, check pain relief, check bowel movements. The problem with heavy painkillers, particularly opiates such as morphine, is they slow down your bowels. Even though you don’t feel hungry and you’re only managing small bits of food…..after a week of no movement, you begin to get panicky. Laxatives at-the-ready…..and everyone cheers when you have your first poo! It’s quite amusing, nurses and doctors ask those questions: “passing wind?”…..”any bowel movements?”. At first it’s a bit embarrassing, but soon enough you’re happily telling the nurse or anaesthetist the detail of these things, often in front of an awkwardly listening visitor who really doesn’t want to hear about it. You get quite blasé about sharing graphic information…..you’re lying there with your bag of pee with your catheter pipe in full view for goodness sakes, pipes and lines coming out of your body from every angle, nurses popping in and out to take blood in front of people, you forget eventually what is acceptable for public viewing and hearing, and you don’t really care any more!

Thursday evening my surgeon came as usual to visit but this time we knew it was with the pathology results of my tumour. After being resected, it had been sent away for testing and my surgeon had hurried the process, knowing my Dad would be leaving after the weekend to go back to Spain. We were all naturally anxious to hear the news and the atmosphere was pretty tense. Even he looked pretty emotional as he relayed the news….made me realise how dedicated these people are to the well-being of their patients. He told us that the whole tumour was encased in a sort of membrane, which he carefully cut around leaving the whole thing intact. There were no signs of damage to the exterior of the tumour, leaving almost zero possibility that any was left behind. Even the part they were most concerned about, where it was growing into the vena cava, he managed to cut cleanly around it, with no chance of any cells being knocked off or left behind.  Quite an incredible bit of surgery and we were all obviously delighted by the news. He said the next step would be to see the Endocrinologist who would take care of my ongoing follow-up, to investigate why it was there in the first place, carry out genetic tests and ensure regular screening against any recurrence. That c-word lurking again in my mind, I had to ask the question that had been haunting me….did I/do I have cancer? You could see how difficult it was for him to answer this question….but ultimately he said I had a primary cancer and he was absolutely certain he removed all of it before it had the chance to spread any further than my vena cava. Therefore cancer gone. Despite being such a traumatic experience, I think we all realised right then just how incredibly lucky I am. Every cloud has a silver lining.

That night Dad and James stayed for dinner with me as a little celebration.

Celebrating

The week went by like that, and I can honestly say I would not have gotten through it without the support of my surgeon, anaesthetist, the nurses, my friends who visited, the gifts and flowers that were sent (James said it was embarrassing to see my window from outside – mine was simply overrun by the colour of all the beautiful flowers sent to me).

Flowers

But that week, I must say, that week was a week I can never thank my amazing father enough for. He really has the patience of a saint. He sat and witnessed things that a father should never have to witness, he sat patiently as I slept, reading his iPad quietly to himself.

Dad

 

The day he had to leave was a truly awful day. We had all hoped that I would be able to go home before he flew away but I just wasn’t quite well enough. So he came that morning, as usual….but then had to say goodbye a couple of hours later. I cannot express how much my heart broke…..and I could see his was breaking too. After a teary cuddle, he finally left me there sobbing, the kind of tears that choke you……to get on a plane to go all the way back to the other side of the world. Again, guilt consumed me – why could I not be stronger? How could I let my Dad leave seeing me so upset?

If you’re somebody who has chosen to live so far from home and family, you’ll appreciate the pain we both felt. At times like this, you need your family. I was so lucky my Dad was able to travel so far to be with me. Again, every cloud….

The next day I pleaded to go home. I had had enough, and it wasn’t the same without Dad there. I just couldn’t look at the corner of the room where he had been sitting all week without feeling upset. James had taken that next week off work to be with me, central line was out, the epidural and catheter had been out for a couple of days, I was a bit more mobile and all my lines had slowly been taken out over the week one by one.

Central line out

I was almost human again and it was time to go home.

4. ICU

At a number of points during that following week I remember thinking why the hell did nobody warn me of this? It seemed almost cruel to me that they would send me into this week of hell without any warning. Perhaps, ignorance is bliss. Those weeks leading up to surgery were bad enough without having to prepare myself for what was to come after.

My first memories post-op were the voices of James, my Dad and the surgeon chatting to each other…..no idea what about, I just knew they were there and they sounded happy. I was seriously groggy…..could hardly keep my eyes open, just drifted in and out of consciousness peacefully. Nurses kept on trying to wake me…..get me to talk, but I was having none of it! Sleep is far too lovely thank you very much! It’s very strange reflecting on this now actually…..I am searching my memories to remember. So James filled in the gaps for me.

Dad and James went their separate ways after I went through to theatre – Dad went down to the cafe with his iPad to pass the time, James went to the gym. Both had been given a ball-park of up to 5 hours for the surgery and they would receive a call when it was complete. When James finished his gym session, he found a missed call on his phone from my surgeon’s mobile. Way before the surgery was due to finish, he naturally started to panic and called right back. The anaesthetist answered cheerfully and said it’s all done – successful op, she’s doing really well – just being stitched up and you’ll be able to see her in recovery in 90mins. Delighted with the news, he called Dad and they both met again at the hospital to wait for me to come through. I had been booked in for 2 nights in Intensive Care for close monitoring so they waited there. They waited, and waited. Repeatedly asking the ICU staff where I was……they kept on saying the same: ‘she’ll be through soon’. Stress levels started to rise, having been told I would be through a long time ago now….and I think a few frank words were exchanged between my bodyguards and the ICU staff whilst I was in the land of not-wanting-to-wake-up. I remember the nurses trying to wake me….and I just couldn’t shake myself awake. If I had any idea how worried Dad and James were, I would have given myself a good slap. The drugs they had given me had clearly knocked me out!

I have a vague memory of the surgeon showing my Dad a picture of the tumour on his mobile phone, my poor Dad. I really don’t remember much of that first day…..I think they brought me an omelette to try eat, which I tried with Dad’s help. Feeling like a child again, my Dad carefully cuts up my food and helps me reluctantly take a bite or two.

Then it’s night time…..Dad and James have gone home…..I’m behind curtains with orangey-yellow lights and shadows of nurses moving around helping out the 6 patients in ICU that night – a full house and very noisy. All of a sudden I’m aware I can’t move. Can’t sit up, can’t even turn. I feel paralysed, trapped. I look around and there seem to be a hundred different lines coming out of me going into beeping machines. I have 3 or 4 IV lines in my hands and lower arms, a central line in my neck with quite a few lines coming out, an epidural in my spine, oxygen nubbins in my nose and a catheter.

LinesICU

Fear washes over me as I realise how serious my condition is. Not 10 minutes goes by without a nurse coming in to check on you, writing observations down in a thick file of notes at the foot of my bed. I can’t say much – I’m almost incapable of talking. My mind is blank, in shock, struggling to understand why so much fuss is required. I must be drifting in and out of consciousness, because all of a sudden there are 3 nurses next to me man-handling a machine that seems to be misbehaving – my epidural or my pain pump has run out, and clearly the machines are not easy to refill and reset. This happens repeatedly throughout my stay in hospital….various nurses cursing at these new machines that they all seem to hate.

I wake up the next morning for what feels like the 40th time and it seems to be getting light outside…..and all of a sudden I am in a lot of pain. I have a pain pump, a button which releases fast-acting IV pain relief, that perhaps I have not been pressing enough. All I remember is intense burning pain down my right side. They try to roll me on my side to check my epidural line and I almost scream in agony. The reality of my situation dumps itself on me like a lead weight and I feel trapped and panicked. I had no idea it was going to be as hellish as this and I feel angry that I’m mentally so unprepared. In the delirium of my pain, they give me a bolus on my epidural and increased the constant levels. Suddenly I feel like someone is standing on my chest and I can’t breathe…..start to panic and hyper-ventilate. Nobody told me that this bolus would creep up my chest and, in-effect, paralyse the bottom of my lungs. A nurse is there, James is there…..I feel like I might suffocate. I have never felt more close to death. Eventually I calm down and the numbing effect of the epidural blocks my pain.

During the day, my Dad sits patiently by my side as I drift in and out of consciousness. This is what he would do for the entire week – so that James could continue to work this week. Dad was on daytime duty and James was on early morning and evening duty. They were both amazing. On this second day in ICU most people who had been with me in there the night before were moved on down to the ward, so they moved me out of the corner and across to the other side of the room and faced me with a gorgeous wrap-around view of Mount Eden. I remember watching the little figures of people standing at the top taking photographs of the beautiful panorama and wishing I was there, not here. One day soon I will go up that Mount and be one of those little people and I’ll look back at that window and realise how far I’ve come.

Mount Eden

Some time later on that day, I had my first complete meltdown. My pain levels increased again and the nurse told me off for not staying on top of it by pressing the pump enough. Apparently you need to press the pump in advance of pain, keep on top of it. Well I’m sorry, but firstly I’ve never used a pain pump before, secondly I’ve never had surgery on my abdomen….and quite frankly, I’ve never experienced such pain in my life and my pre-planning rational mindset is not quite in gear. So forgive me for being on a learning curve! I remember crying, no actually sobbing….hyperventilating again, totally flipping out. No father should have to watch his daughter go through such a thing….I could feel his heart breaking as he watched me go through hell and back and I felt so guilty I couldn’t be braver for him. The nurses fluster around me trying to make me more comfortable. Dad holds my hand as I try to calm down. All I want to do is escape my body that seems to have broken down to a point I never thought possible….I just want peace, no pain. I feel desperate. Eventually I calm down and I find myself staring at that beautiful view and the miniature people again. My Dad continues to hold my hand, sits patiently watching me. He really is an amazing man.

The next morning is a repeat of the first….I wake up in ridiculous amounts of pain, clearly not been on top of it again. The anaesthetist visits me, as he does every day, and looks though my file and what levels of the drugs I’ve been on. He suggests a new drug to add to my cocktail that might help – clonidine. I nod, trusting him and desperate to try anything that might help….so long as it doesn’t give the same suffocating effects of the bolus on my epidural the day before. So clonidine is added to one of my IV lines, and within minutes I’m out-of-it. James arrives and, not that I remember, he told me I couldn’t even string a few words together. I was totally doped. He came all that way to find me incapable of communicating in any way. It must have been a shock for him to see me like that…..and afterwards I feel guilty that I’m not braver and able to handle the pain. I think I came around in a few hours…..my Dad was there again sitting by my side and I had no recollection of anything past my anaesthetist talking to me at 6am.

After 2 nights in ICU, I hoped to be able to go down to the ward. My noradrenaline levels had been reduced right down, to counteract the effects of the drugs I had taken prior to surgery. My other observations and tests seemed to be going well. But the biggest test for being able to go back to my room on the ward is getting on my feet. Sounds easy…..really, no. The Physio arrives and helps me sit up on the edge of the bed. I have never felt so heavy in my life. My legs seem to hang, incapably down from the bed and I can hardly keep my head up. My right leg is numb from the epidural spreading. Instantly, nausea sweeps over me. The nurse takes one arm and the Physio takes the other and they lift me to my feet. My tummy pulls – won’t allow me to stand up straight, and I’m forced into a hunched position. I remember having to tell my own feet to take a step. Shuffling like an old lady with lines dragging behind me, they walk me in a very small circle in the curtained-off area round my bed. The whole time my body is screaming out ‘get me back to bed, I just want to lie down’. Getting mobile after a surgery like this is one of the hardest things to achieve….and this was just the beginning.

The Physio, not convinced by my first attempt, returns in a couple of hours and we repeat the process again, this time with my Dad helping by holding me up on one side. I remember thinking again how sad it is that he should be having to do any of this. Pleased that I managed it twice, I got the clearance to go down to the ward. Dad and I waited for the nurse to come and he pushed the bed with her down to my room.

Dad pushing me down to ward

No more bright lights in the night time, patients calling out, noisy machines, alarms, constant checks. The staff in there were just incredible and I am humbled by the job they do – it can’t be easy taking care of such acutely sick people and dealing with their stressed loved-ones…..and they work ridiculous hours. It takes a very special kind of person to do that job and I am full of admiration and gratitude.

Two nights in ICU had felt like 2 months and I have to say I was glad to leave. Now I had the peace of my own little room, a place where I would overcome a lot of battles in the week ahead.